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AD’s first insider trip to Marrakech has sold out. But we are now offering a second one hosted by @adaesthete from October 23 to 28. Created in partnership with @indagaretravel, this one-of-a-kind design tour takes guests inside some of Marrakech’s most private sites including Pierre Bergé and Yves Saint Laurent’s legendary Villa Oasis, and several celebrated houses that have never before been opened to the public. Visit the link in our bio for the full itinerary and info on how you can join. Photo courtesy of @royalmansour
To reinvent her aesthetic for her new Malibu house, supermodel and designer @erinwasson worked hand in hand with her business partner and collaborator, interior designer @joshevaninteriors. “We’ve been putting spaces together since we were teenagers in Texas,” Evan, says. “For this house, we wanted to keep it super minimal." After a moment, he adds with a laugh: "Well, for Erin it's minimal, because she's been such a collector and maximalist over all these years." The result is an airy, bright space in a palette of whites and pinks. Wasson’s impressive art collection is scattered throughout every room: a Mario Lopez lamp here (“I got that at auction for $20 because it’s missing the original rattan parrot!” she says), a Robert Laughlin chair there. A visitor to her home would be forgiven for wanting to know the provenance of nearly every object, and while there's certainly a story behind each, her two couches are perhaps the most eye-catching. The sitting room’s sleek black piece is a deSede Terrazza by Ubald Klug, commonly referred to as a waterfall couch, seen here. “I remember being 20 years old and seeing that piece of furniture and saying, ‘That is the most interesting thing in the world. One day I'm going to own that,’” Wasson says. After being outbid dozens of times in the intervening years, Evan was able to help her finally track it down via @eBay and have it shipped from the Czech Republic. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the home. Photo by @christopherpatey; text by @julietizon
“Home is everything,” says model and California native @lilyaldridge, who relocated to Nashville after meeting her Tennessee-born husband, music artist Caleb Followill (of @kingsofleon) more than a decade ago. “We both travel a lot for work, but we do everything in our power to go in and out as fast as possible so we can have a normal life here.” For the decor of their 1930s Tudor Revival home, Aldridge presented designers @pierceandward  with a @pinterest board of inspirations ranging from romantic English country houses to exotic Moroccan riads. “We were all on the same page,” says Emily Ward, who, with Louisa Pierce, cheerfully scavenged antiques stores and @eBay for eclectica such as leather club chairs, poufs, chandeliers, and a mélange of midcentury-modern pieces. The home’s original wood floors, beamed ceilings, expansive windows serve as a picturesque backdrop. “I love those details, and they’re hard to re-create,” Aldridge explains. In the master bathroom, a shiraz carpet leads to the @signaturehw claw-foot tub and a moorish incense burner that was repurposed as a pendant hangs from above. Discover more of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @lesleemitchell; text by @janekeltnerdev; styled by @jessica_sailervanlith
“This is not the typical French architecture that you find in Paris,” notes @juliedelibran of her home in a former archive structure near Montparnasse. As #AD100 architect @charles_zana explains, a goal when converting the industrial storage space into a home was was “to maintain its original spirit, so we opened the spaces, uncovered the underlying brick and steel, and reoriented the house to the gardens.” The daughter and niece of interior designers, de Libran already had a clear picture of exactly how she wanted the home to look when she took it over, which not everybody can do. But then, she has spent years training her mind to see clothes that don’t exist, as a designer and most recently the creative director of @soniarykiel. The most vital additions were the two gardens—a big one in the courtyard designed by Louis Benech, and a more private terrace around the back. In the entrance hall, Libran often arranges flowers from them in the stone sink, seen here. Vintage Gio Ponti tiles line the walls and a pendant from @rwguild illuminates the nook. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the home. Photo by @ambroisetezenas; text by Joshua Levine; styled by @carolinairving
“I was imagining something telluric, from an abyss under the surface of the sea or in a very deep cave,” says Paris-based designer Mattia Bonetti of the fantastical dining table he dreamed up in 2003. “Trees, corals, bubbling volcanoes—all these shapes together become a table, et voilà!” Fittingly, he named it Abyss. The otherworldly creation, which made its debut at a show at London’s @davidgillgallery, was part of a minuscule edition of eight (two have yet to be realized) and costs around $300,000, plus shipping. (It weighs a whopping 838 pounds.) Still, despite its rarity, the table sprouts from the floors of tastemakers worldwide. Collector @georgelindemann1 bought the first one, all pinks and golds, for his Miami Beach house, where it is joined by eight complementary chairs that he commissioned from Bonetti. Dealer @pierrepassebon proudly displays one of bronze with silver and gold plating from 2004, in his Paris apartment, seen here surrounded by vintage chairs by Franco Campo and Carlo Graffi, and Gino Marotta’s “Amore Mio” (1968). #AD100 talent @frankdebiasi, who decorated Lindemann’s home, explains the powerful appeal of Bonetti’s wild Abyss: “When the kids sit around it, it looks like a kids’ table, and when the adults sit around it, it becomes very sophisticated. It’s actually much more classical than you think.” See more of Bonetti’s special creation through the link in our profile. Photo by @francoishalard; text by @_h_mart_
Supermodel and designer @erinwasson had previously lived in Venice Beach for 16 years before she began yearning for more solitude, more space, and a less frenetic neighborhood. “I was lucky enough to take a long trip one day and wander upon this house,” she says of the one-level home in Malibu that she dubs "Regency beachside style," in reference to the distinctive British design period from 1795 to 1837. “I contacted the woman who owned it and the rest is history," Wasson says of the house, whose back side is entirely made up of sliding glass doors that open up to postcard-perfect views of the ocean. The home, however, necessitated a very different decor than Wasson’s previous Los Angeles house or her New York apartment. Whereas her Venice space was packed with art pieces—“Oh my God, it was like every nook and cranny,” Evan says—her new house is pared down to only the essentials. “It was like I was handed a job as a curator in a new museum,” Wasson says. “Before, I put a lot of things on the wall, perhaps as armor. In this place, I took a much more intellectualized approach to the whole thing.” She worked hand in hand with her business partner and collaborator, interior designer @joshevaninteriors, to reinvent her aesthetic for her new house. “We’ve been putting spaces together since we were teenagers in Texas,” Evan, who was present at the model's "Ranch Tropez"–themed nuptials in Austin last month, says. Artist @fabian_marti created the sculptures and large green painting in this corner of the living space. Discover the rest of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @christopherpatey; text by @julietizon
The @missoni brand is known for its embrace of bold colors and contrasting prints, and this same ethos informs the look of Margherita Maccapani Missoni Amos’s (@mmmargherita) family home in Varese. “Color and shape took priority over period coherence,” Missoni Amos says. The majority of the furnishings were sourced online—“Cruising @ebay is one of my favorite activities”—or found on frequent day trips with husband Eugenio Amos. “We’d agree to take a day off to go on a romantic adventure. So we’d wake up at 5:00 a.m., open the newspaper, and say, ‘Today, let’s go to this art fair in Belgium.’ We’d jump in the car and try and make it back in time for dinner.” Missoni Amos never bothered with a tape measure, buying items on instinct and storing them in a rapidly expanding facility nearby. In the end, “incredibly, nearly everything fit perfectly,” she boasts. “My favorite room is my office—it’s the only part of the house that is entirely mine,” Missoni Amos says, admitting that it’s a relief to her husband that she has a place to display her collections of daisies—margherita means “daisy” in Italian—and Venetian masks. Also seen in the office is a @venini_official chanedelier and a large artwork by @carolinewalkerartist. Visit the link in our profile to see more of the home. Photo by @matthieusalvaing; text by @derekblasberg; produced by @janekeltnerdev; styled by @casamota
At first, it can be difficult to tell the difference between @erinwasson’s sunlit California living room and a finely curated gallery space. Wasson, of course, is one of the world’s most celebrated supermodels, having appeared in ad campaigns for the likes of @gucci, @chanelofficial, and @dolcegabbana. But even a cursory glance around her Malibu home reveals that she could have had a robust second career as an interior decorator; she has an incredible eye for design. The aesthetic is anything but contrived: At age 17, Wasson lived above an art gallery in Dallas, where she met many artists who would become lifelong friends. “It was kind of an urban commune situation,” she recalls. “It was this compressed moment where there were all these extraordinary talents living in Dallas at the same time.” A common thread throughout Wasson’s career has been collaborating with friends, and the design of her home in Malibu was no exception. She worked hand in hand with her business partner and collaborator, interior designer @joshevaninteriors, to reinvent her aesthetic for her new house. “We’ve been putting spaces together since we were teenagers in Texas,” Evan says. “For this house, we wanted to keep it super minimal." After a moment, he adds with a laugh: "Well, for Erin it's minimal, because she's been such a collector and maximalist over all these years." Visit the link in our profile for a tour of the home. Photo by @christopherpatey; text by @julietizon
The undertaking was almost daunting enough to deter Amy and former Rhode Island congressman Patrick Kennedy—son of the late Senator Edward “Ted” Kennedy—from even taking on the renovation of the 1904 Hyannis Port “garage” that had fallen to them. But the desire to give their burgeoning brood of kids the same idyllic summertime experiences Patrick had grown up with overruled any hesitations. Vivid images of the famed Kennedy compound are emblazoned in the eyes of several generations: Marine One landing on the lawn for weekends President John F. Kennedy spent with his brothers; cousins running toward the helicopter to greet their fathers. Patrick wasn’t born yet, but he speaks of it as if he remembers. But for one of the most iconic bloodlines in America, the approach to design is far from flashy. Amy and Patrick repurposed much of what was inside the dusty inherited former carriage house of the residence his Irish Catholic grandfather Joseph P. Kennedy Sr., with wife Rose Kennedy, purchased in 1928, “principally because they weren’t allowed to join any other community,” says Patrick of the place they famously raised their nine children. ”What my wife, Amy, did was transform what was frankly a garage into a home,” says Patrick of the year-and-a-half-long renovation. Visit the link in our profile to see inside the finished project. Photo by @joestpierre; text by @katromeyn
With its exposed steel beams, @juliedelibran’s Paris home feels more like a New York loft than the Haussmanian jewel box she once lived in above with its chiseled crown moldings. “It’s quite industrial,” the artistic director of @soniarykiel notes. “This is not the typical French architecture that you find in Paris.” De Libran tapped #AD100 architect @charles_zana to help transform the structure that formerly served as an archive finto an airy home for her family while maintaining the home’s original spirit. To do so, Zana explains, he “opened the spaces, uncovered the underlying brick and steel, and reoriented the house to the gardens.” In a dining nook, chairs by Sylvain Dubuisson surround a marble-topped Eero Saarinen dining table for @knollinc. The open shelving unit by Franco Albini ensures a view to the garden while a red bookcase by @indiamahdavi electrifies the space. Discover more of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @ambroisetezenas; text by Joshua Levine; styled by @carolinairving
“The main idea was to make a piece of sculpture,” says Paris-based designer Mattia Bonetti of the fantastical dining table he dreamed up in 2003. “I was imagining something telluric, from an abyss under the surface of the sea or in a very deep cave. Trees, corals, bubbling volcanoes—all these shapes together become a table, et voilà!” Fittingly, he named it Abyss. Sheet steel, because of its ability to be rendered perfectly flat, was used for the surface, while the baroque base was cast in bronze. Then, to achieve the glossy, electric hues in his imagination, Bonetti called upon a cousin, a professional gilder, to coat the table with white gold leaf and colorful transparent varnishes. Meant to be a usable sculpture, it had, he says, “some requirements of economy. It needed a certain height [29.5 inches], depth [51.2 inches], comfort, and someplace to put your feet and legs under.” The otherworldly creation, which made its debut at a show at London’s @davidgillgallery, was part of a minuscule edition of eight (two have yet to be realized) and costs around $300,000, plus shipping. (It weighs a whopping 838 pounds.) Still, despite its rarity, the table sprouts from the floors of tastemakers worldwide, such as @francis_sultana who has a red-and-gold Abyss in his Maltese palazzo, seen here. Discover why Bonetti’s far-out design makes for riveting table talk through the link in our profile. Photo by @simonuptonphotos; text by @_h_mart_
At his live/work house in Amagansett, New York, @rogangregory manipulates organic materials, from marble to beach sand, with forms that tend toward the biomorphic and the geological, as if they’ve been pulled out of the ground or washed up on the shore. A lamp made of hard-carved alabaster, for instance, looks like nothing so much as a pearl cozily tucked away in an oyster. “I do functional pieces, but I have the freedom to do pure sculpture too,” says the soft-­spoken and resplendently bearded Gregory, whose latest creations go on view at Manhattan’s @randcompanynyc gallery this September. Comprising dozens of objects, his exhibition, titled “Known Unknown,” marks the first solo show at R & Co.’s new three-story, 8,000-square-foot space in Tribeca. “The gallery has a lot of dimension,” says Gregory, who will hang some of his lighting pieces within the 40-foot-tall atrium. “That means I can really scale things up.” Take a closer look at the former fashion designer’s sculptural creations through the link in our profile. Photo by Max Burkhalter; text by @looslips