Tony Vincent

Tony Vincent Follow

5th grade teacher sharing friendly tech tips and ideas

http://learninginhand.com/

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It happens. You close a browser tab and then, oops, you realize you actually wanted to keep that tab open. The next time this happens, try the keyboard shortcut of Shift + Control/Command + T. This key combination reopens the last tab that you closed. Perhaps the phrase “Surf the Closed Tab” can help you remember the combination of keys. The shortcut works in most web browsers, including Chrome, Explorer, and Safari.
There is not an emoji for everything, so symbolically representing vocabulary can be a stretch—a really big thinking stretch when you’re the one developing the representation. It can take a while to figure out how to clearly show a vocabulary term with emojis, which is why symbolically representing vocabulary can be an interesting learning activity.
Headliner.app is a free web-based video maker. There’s no trial, no watermark, and no length limitations. It’s just free. Headliner is not quite a full video editor—it’s designed to illustrate audio, somewhat like Adobe Spark Video. At headliner.app, you upload audio and then add media, which can be a combination of images and videos. You can also add text. Automatically generated captions from the uploaded audio are shown at the bottom of the screen. You can edit or turn off the captions.
Google Chrome can remember your passwords for you—making it easier to use a different (and complex) password for each website. If signed in, your passwords are synced with your Google Account and accessible on other devices, including Chrome on iOS and Android.
Working on a computer and want to insert emojis? You can see a listing of emojis at emojicopy.com. Click an emoji to add it to the lineup. Click the copy button after your lineup is complete and then paste anywhere you can type.
If you’ve got a lot of links that you access frequently, then you might consider adding folders to Chrome’s bookmarks bar. Organizing links to web pages and online documents into folders in the bookmarks bar can give you access to those items in two clicks.
👀 How about adding visual cues to your digital calendar with emojis? Since emojis can be entered anywhere you can enter text, you can add emojis to calendar events. I include a meaningful emoji that serves as an icon for each event in my calendar. When I view my calendar on my computer, tablet, phone, or watch, the emojis provide illustration.
There is not an emoji for everything, so symbolically representing vocabulary can be a stretch—a really big thinking stretch when you’re the one developing the representation. It can take a while to figure out how to clearly show a vocabulary term with emojis, which is why symbolically representing vocabulary can be a great learning activity.
👋😁 Enter text into emojitranslate.com. It replaces some words with pictures. You can copy the “emojified” text and paste it anywhere. This is handy for spicing up instructions, playing with language, making announcements, telling a story, and getting a laugh.
I like being one click away from each of the webpages and documents that I frequently open. I’ve added links to what I often visit to Chrome’s bookmarks bar. The problem is most of the things I’ve bookmarked have long names–names that take up precious space. I deal with that by right-clicking each bookmark and replacing the name with a descriptive emoji. For example, I often access a Google document about tech camp. I’ve added the document to my bookmark’s bar and have replaced the name with a tent emoji. The bookmark takes up less space, allowing me to fit more links onto the bookmarks bar. 👍
Flaticon.com has a growing collection of icons and clipart. In fact, they boast that 4,000 icons are added each month. You’ll most likely be downloading images as PNG. PNG images can be used in pretty much any app. PNG supports transparency, so you’ll see no white boxes around these icons! While you can use Flaticon for free, you are required to attribute the illustration to Flaticon. If you pay $90 a year or $10 a month for a Premium subscription you can use all illustrations without any attribution. Paid subscribers also get access to premium icons.
There are several reasons why you may want to blur faces in your video. Perhaps you don’t have permission, perhaps a stranger entered a shot, or perhaps your video features a mystery person. Here’s how to blur faces: After your video is uploaded to YouTube, click the Edit Video button. Then click the Enhancements tab, and then click the Blurring effects tab. After clicking Edit next to Blur Faces, YouTube will begin the process of finding faces in your video. It can take quite a while to process, and it’s ok if you leave YouTube and return later. After processing, you’ll see thumbnails for each of the faces that YouTube detected. Click the thumbnail(s) of the faces you’d like to blur. You can play the preview to see frosted circles placed over the selected face(s). YouTube uses motion tracking, so the blur moves with the face. You can save the changes in the existing video or save as a new video.