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The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is a research and cultural center serving scholars and the general public. #atTheH

http://huntington.org/

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We’re celebrating the #firstsnow too...of camellias 😬
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For the full autumn bloom report, check out our story. 👆👀🌸🌹🌼
Fall #lewks, ca. 1850.
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Genio C. Scott, American fashions fall and winter, 1850, n.146 Broadway, NY. Jay T. Last Collection, The Huntington. #VaultTuesday: taking you into the archives to show you some of the amazing things not currently in view.
Today’s the day! 🎉See new works inspired by Huntington collections in "Rituals of Labor of Engagement: #CarolinaCaycedo and #MarioYbarraJr.," on view NOW through Feb. 25. Hear all about each artist’s approach and experience during their #5atTheH residency, produced with @vpam_arts, in an amazing new video (link in bio). 👀🎬👆✨
During Mario Ybarra Jr.’s #5atTheH residency, seeing the intricate etchings of Albrecht Dürer and vibrant illuminated pages made a lasting impression: “The level of craftsmanship and the intimate size of the works captivated me....In my looking, viewing, exploring, and reading, I sought a reflection of my identity—native, Californian, brown, and thriving.”
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Using traditional printmaking processes, Ybarra created a series of etchings, mixing his own iconography with imagery drawn from his residency. Ybarra also produced drawings that reflect his daily labor and practice, featuring text, portraits, fantastical creatures, and pop culture references that echo the ornate and colorful details of an illuminated page.
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Ybarra’s work will be on view as part of our exhibit, “Rituals of Labor and Engagement,” opening this Sat., Nov. 10. This exhibition is produced in partnership with @vpam_arts, as part of the contemporary arts initiative /five.
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Installation view of a 16th-century Venetian ducali fragment, The Huntington. #MarioYbarraJr., "It's Okay 2 Slay," 2018, marker and acrylic paint on paper; detail of “Gazing...Calder...Nopales,” 2018, aquatint etching.
Hanging out with the newest blooms in the #Shakespeare Garden. 🌼🌞🌸
During Carolina Caycedo’s #5atTheH residency, the archives themselves inspired her work. “I think of a collection as a time machine that captures, classifies, and manipulates the past. History itself often lends authenticity to a collection, giving it status. What if the past rebels and becomes a force that now haunts the present?”
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Approaching the collections with that idea, Caycedo created a display screen using scanned copies of Huntington paintings, photographs, maps, manuscripts, and images from books, and organized them without hierarchy alongside her own photographs. Caycedo also produced a film, “Apariciones / Apparitions,” in which ghostly figures interrupt and challenge Huntington spaces with their presence, coming alive in spaces normally reserved for books, plants, and portraits.
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Both works will be on view as part of our exhibit, “Rituals of Labor and Engagement,” opening this Sat., Nov. 10. This exhibition is produced in partnership with @vpam_arts, as part of the contemporary arts initiative /five.
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#CarolinaCaycedo, details of “To walk in the present looking forward towards the past, carrying the future on our back / Caminar por el presente mirando de frente hacia el pasado, cargando el futuro en nuestra espalda,” 2018; video clip from “Apariciones / Apparitions,” 2018. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by @katemakesfilms.
History shows us that every #vote counts: in this document from our Civil War collections, Abraham Lincoln used data from the 1864 state-wide elections to project the potential results of the presidential election, taking place less than a month later. Though Lincoln ended up easily defeating his opponent George B. McClellan in the general election, it wasn't until he saw these projected results that he believed he had a chance of winning.
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To hear more about the events leading up to the 1864 elections (and see more Lincoln material!), check out our story with The Huntington’s curator of American history, Olga Tspina. 🇺🇸🗳✔️
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#AbrahamLincoln’s tabulations for the upcoming 1864 #election. #CivilWar collections at The Huntington.
Hello Monday. ☁️🌵☁️
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Tag your photo with #atTheH on your next visit, and we might repost—or display in our Mapel Orientation Gallery. 📸: @zachthoennes
Installation is underway for “Rituals of Labor and Engagement,” our #5atTheH exhibit opening in a little over a week! Drawings and prints by @mario_ybarra_jr are being hung, while a film by @lacaycedo is being tested in gallery for color and lighting. More sneak peeks to come!
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“Rituals of Labor and Engagement: #CarolinaCaycedo and #MarioYbarraJr.” opens Nov. 10 as part of our contemporary arts initiative #5atTheH, produced in collaboration with @vpam_arts.
To celebrate #Halloween, we’re sharing a little history behind the iconic story of Mary Shelley’s #Frankenstein. Though it’s one of the most well-known works of fiction to feature artificial life, Shelley actually drew inspiration from REAL experiments on electricity at the time, including some that attempted to reanimate the dead.
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Galvanism, which used electricity to jolt muscles into movement, was named after the work of scientist Luigi Galvani; but it was the experiments of his nephew, Giovanni Aldini, that truly scandalized Europe. In 1803 near Newgate Prison in London, Aldini applied electricity to the body of executed murderer George Forster, in what became an infamous event. Witness accounts note that “The jaw began to quiver, the adjoining muscles were horribly contorted, and the left eye actually opened…” Some even believed that Forster had actually been brought back to life.
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These were the kinds of experiments that inspired new scientific theories about life and death; and proved to be an inspiration to Shelley, as she directly noted the influence of #galvanism in the 1831 edition of her novel.
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Want to hear more about #Frankenstein? Click the link in our profile to hear talks from scholars, scientists, and writers in a recent conference at The Huntington, celebrating the 200th anniversary of Shelley’s novel.
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#MaryShelley, “Frankenstein” or “The Modern Prometheus,” 1818; Giovanni #Aldini, pages detailing early electrical experiments on human cadavers from Essai théorique et expérimental sur le galvanisme. Paris: Fournier fils, 1804. Francis Hauksbee, page from “Physico-mechanical experiments on various subjects...” 1719. #TheHuntington.
Let the countdown begin! Starting Nov. 10, see new, Huntington-inspired works from #5atTheH artists Carolina Caycedo and Mario Ybarra Jr. in “Rituals of Labor and Engagement: Carolina Caycedo and Mario Ybarra Jr.,” an exhibit produced in partnership with @vpam_arts. Click the link in our profile for more details, and stay tuned for more sneak peeks. 👆👀✨
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Stills (details) from “Apariciones/Apparitions,” a video project by #CarolinaCaycedo. Choreographed by Marina Magalhães and shot by David de Rozas. Courtesy of the artist; #MarioYbarraJr., “Spray Paint” (detail) and “Go Big” (detail), 2018. Courtesy of the artist.
Proof that Saturday’s #DramaAfterDark event was spooktacular. 🖤🎃😱
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Tag #atTheH on your next visit and we might repost, or display in our Mapel Orientation Gallery. 📸: @zacthebestt (1 & 4), @denise.harkavy, and @instarayla. #Spooktober #PoeandGorey